How does the Sun look likes in pictures taken from 77 million kilometres?

The images were sent by the European Space Agency’s Solar Orbiter, which was launched into space earlier this year. The latest information provided by this arbitrator named Solo also includes images of the Sun’s rays which are called ‘campfire’. These rays are millions of times lighter than the Sun, but they are regularly observed from Earth through a telescope.

These seemingly small rays may be responsible for the warm atmosphere around the Sun, which is much warmer than its surface. This friendly environment is also called corona.

Daniel Miller, a scientist, working on the ‘Aisa’ project, says that the surface of the Sun is not so hot, and the temperature of its outer orbit is five and a half thousand degrees. The famous American physicist Eugene Parker thought that if there were too many small rays around the Sun, it would keep the corona extremely hot.

David Burgmans is the Royal Observatory in Belgium heads the team working on the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager. The Extreme Ultraviolet Imager is a collection of special telescopes designed to take pictures of the corona’s structure around the Sun.

Image: BBC

David Bergmans says that whatever the role of these rays, but their size is minimal, that is why they have been hidden from the eyes of scientists for so long. The smallest of these rays is about two pixels. One pixel has a range of up to four hundred kilometres. This is called a special resolution, which means that it will be the same size as many European countries. They may be smaller in format.

The European Space Agency launched the satellite in February through a rocket from the US Cape Canaveral station. The satellite’s mission was to find out about the Sun’s unique behaviour.

The sun rays and the behaviour of this star are not limited to conveying heat and light to the Earth. These rays from the Sun disrupt the radio communication system, and the magnetic orbit of the star shuts down the electrical devices in the satellite. Research with the help of solo arbitrators will help scientists better understand this disorder.

Caroline Harper, head of the British Space Agency, says the coronavirus has given us an idea of ​​how important it is to stay in touch with each other and that satellite communication systems are essential.

“That’s why we need to understand the sun’s behaviour better so that we can predict its weather,” he said just like we have understood the weather of the Earth.

This solar orbiter has made several orbits around the Sun and will gradually get closer to it, until it and the Sun are only less than 43 million kilometres away.

Keep in mind that our Earth is approximately 150 million kilometres away from the Sun. At the same time, the orbiter will enter the orbit of Mercury, the neighbouring planet to the Sun. The images sent were taken from the planet Venus.

These images are historically the closest ever to the Sun, but in terms of resolution, they are not the best. Resolution means how many pixels are in an image. The more pixels there are, the better the image. In that sense, the powerful telescopes on Earth are far better than solo orbiters. But the technology and equipment used in this research, as well as the presence of six different sensing instruments, enhance its features.

Mark McGregor, a leading science and exploration adviser, says:

“This solar orbiter is not only going to get pictures of the sun, but it will also go to the part of the solar wind where it will not be too tight.” It will conduct close research on magnetic orbits and cells there, as well as quickly detect and send back data about the surface of the Sun so that the two pieces of information can be combined to understand it better. And no other mission or telescope can do that. ”

As the mission progresses, with the help of the planet Venus, the orbiter will pull itself out of the planetary region so that it can reach a point where it can better see the farthest portions of the Sun.

Sami Solanki of the Max Planck Institute in Germany calls these parts ‘terra incognitas’, meaning unknown areas. “From the pole of the sun, we may finally be able to understand about the sun’s magnetic field,” he said. “We know that the Sun’s behaviour depends on its magnetic orbit. But we do not learn how this magnetic orbit is created. We estimate that this is the dynamo that is doing this from inside the Sun.

Just like the dynamo inside the Earth. “But we don’t know how it works, but we are convinced that the role of the polls is very important.” The ESA or similar US space agency is working with NASA.

Holly Gilbert, a scientist who is working on the Solar Orbiter project there, said: “The kind of information we’ve got from the first images gives you an idea of how much more information we’ll get closer to the Sun. It’s exciting.”

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